The legal blog strategy that everyone’s afraid to preach: Write less!

Posted on 02-25-2016 by
Tags: writinglegally , blogging , writing , Top Stories


“Write less” … terrible advice for a writer, right? Stephen King thinks so. He once said:

If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.


Great advice for a novelist but not necessarily for a legal blogger. Before we go any further, let’s kill off this erroneous thought:

Good writing = good blogging.

Stop thinking this way. First and foremost, your mindset should be:

Good blogging = more blogging.

Blogging isn’t the stuff of novels or novellas or short stories. It doesn’t sit safely and dustless between book covers, doesn’t defy time on your bookshelf. Like any writing, blogging has its forms – long form vs. short form – and craft is important too. But there’s another element that separates it from pure writing.  And that is the long-play element of output.

In the blog-o-sphere, good writers die on the vine every second. A well-written blog post isn’t “blogging”; it is merely a stationary subunit of a greater momentum. It’s like a car: the blog post makes up the interior; blogging, the engine. If the engine doesn’t zoom forward, your blog’s worthless no matter how nice the interior.

So how do you keep the engine gassed up and running? One strategy is to write less so you can blog more. And by writing less, I mean shorter blogs = more blogs.

Don’t be suckered by the fallacy that brevity lacks quality. If anything, brevity is a writing ethic:

That writer does the most, who gives his reader the most knowledge, and takes from him the least time. - Charles Caleb Colton


So don’t fool yourself! Less writing is the output of many great writers and influencers. Take for example author, entrepreneur Seth Godin. He posts about a blog a day.

His secret?

Short blogs, some less than 50 words.

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