The Dog Days of Law School: 9 Ways to be More Productive & Make the Most of Your Time

Posted on 09-19-2014 by
Tags: Latst Headlines & Stories , new lawyers , legal profession , productivity , Law school , law students


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Are you feeling bogged down with school work already? Feeling unproductive? In an article by survivelaw.com, they came up with a list of 9 ways to become more productive in law school. Below are suggestions from the article to help you improve your productivity:

1. Plan & Prioritize
Make a study timetable. Make a list of activities you’d rather be doing. You can use some of these activities as study breaks while others can be used as post-exam motivation.

2. Work Out Where You Can Share The Workload Or Where Things Can Be Delayed
Form or attend a study group where you can take notes or find ways to share the workload.

3. Avoid Technology
Working on a computer is a fast way to lose motivation. Between Twitter, Facebook and every other social media site, your attention is quickly drawn away from studying. If you are working on a paper, print off drafts and manually edit them.

4. Take Care Of Yourself
Always make time to take care of yourself and do things you like to do. It’s ok to set aside some time and take breaks so you can stay refreshed and motivated.

5. Focus On One Thing At A Time
Focus on one thing at a time. It will allow you to get things finish, not making progress on numerous things and having nothing done.

6. Group Similar Tasks Together
If you have a couple activities that are repetitive or alike-group them together. Once you get in a groove you’ll be able to get them done quicker.

7. Do Some Easy Tasks
Do some easy subjects first to allow you to feel like you are powering through the work.

8. Know When To Stop
Give each subject equal time to prepare for. It’s better to be equally prepared for multiple subject’s exams than perfectly prepared for one exam.

9. Give In To Procrastination
If you procrastinate and finish watching a TV series chances are you’ll feel bad about it and be extra motivated to return to studying.

For all of those seasoned professionals out there, do you have any other suggestions to share with law students?

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